Some - Any - A - An

English Grammar Rules

The difference between Some, Any, A and An



A and AN

We use A/AN (articles) with singular countable nouns.

A is used when the next word starts with a consonant sound.

AN is used when the next word starts with a vowel sound.

Learn more about Definite and Indefinite Articles.


Some and Any

We use SOME and ANY with plural nouns and uncountable nouns.

Some is generally used in positive sentences.

Any is generally used in negative sentences.


You can also use SOME and ANY in a sentence without a noun if the meaning of the sentence is clear.


Questions with Some and Any

Generally, we use ANY in questions.

But, SOME is used in the following circumstances:

1. When we are offering something.

2. When we are asking for something.

3. When we are suggesting something.


You can also use SOME and ANY in a sentence without a noun if the meaning of the sentence is clear.

I didn't eat any salad but Peter ate some. (salad)

Sean took lots of photos of the mountains but Emma didn't take any. (photos)




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Try our interactive game to practice this: Some - Any - A - An - Game

You should also see our notes about Countable vs Uncountable Nouns.

You may be interested in learning about the difference between Much, Many, Lot and Few


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